#MakeScienceCoolAgain – just how damaging is scientific inaccessibility?

The March for Science took place in cities across the world yesterday, with Washington’s protest seeing tens of thousands in attendance. People poured onto the streets in defiance of the impending budget cuts to research, vocalising the importance of science both on personal, and universal levels. However, in the midst of this positive solidarity, I was particularly struck…

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Brutalism’s revival: The forgotten ethics

Brutalism, identified by its chunky peculiarity and concrete oddity is both adored and loathed, understood and condemned. But as its national demolition is routinely being called for, an insurgence in its popularity has emerged, only to illuminate the current isolation between politics and architecture – a relationship once intrinsic to our fabric of life.

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A Little History of the Microbiome

Continuing with my (apparent) theme of dissecting popular science, I’ve decided to talk about a rapidly growing field of study – that of the microbiome. For those of you who don’t know, the ‘microbiome’ refers to the diverse ecology of bacteria residing within our intestines. To put into context just how vast this range of microorganisms is: we have over 100…

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The Dark Tapes

Michael McQuown’s collection of eldritch tales may fall a little flat due to its lack of decent special effects and a strange stylistic flow, but the ingenuity in its storytelling suggests that fans of the horror genre may have a new rising star to back.

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The Growroom: IKEA’s answer to sustainable farming?

Back in October 2016, The Growroom was launched by Swedish architects Mads-Ulrik Husum and Sine Lindholm. This was done in collaboration with Space10, IKEA’s Copenhagen-based innovation lab (a community united by the joint purpose of designing an eco-friendly way of living). The structure was later exhibited at the Chart Art Fair in Copenhagen. Since then designers have updated it, with…

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