When the music player fades out, lights go on while Lewis Capaldi walks on stage to warm up the audience. This is the opening act for Seafret’s concert in Cardiff: the last date of their U.K. tour.

Capaldi picks up his guitar, looks at the audience for a second and then plays the first chord of his song. He is a young Scottish songwriter, who is “no good at talking between songs”, but very good at communicating while playing. He sings ‘Bruises’ his first ever released song. Lewis seems nervous while talking, but when he starts singing he is just another person: chill, concentrated, and joyful even when singing about breakups. His voice is husky and sweet at the same time, which pleases the audience that claps for him. The young artist leaves the stage, anticipating the arrival of the main band playing tonight: Seafret.

Jack Sedman and Harry Draper are the two components of the duo that comes from Bridlington. Jack, with long, curly, ginger hair, sings and entertains the audience between songs. Harry never talks with words, just music. He keeps swapping from acoustic guitar to piano and then to electronic guitar, playing them all stunningly.

They open the gig with ‘Give Me Something’, ‘Sinking Ship’ and ‘Atlantis’, to set the base of the concert. Some critics have said that Seafret give their best in slower songs and this is exactly where they start the concert from; their forte. A quick look at each other and a smile seems to reveal that the next bit of the concert is going to speed the beat up a little. Harry plays the first note of ‘Wildfire’ and builds up the energy of this beautiful song dedicated to the strength of love, during which a chord of his guitar breaks from the high intensity. They play other singles less known by the audience, but still very pleasant to the ear, before pulling out their most famous songs. Sedman sings their new single ‘Blank You Out’ and then they leave for a few seconds, with the crowd applauding and cheering them back. In the time of a heartbeat they are back for their last song of the night. Sedman jokes with the audience till Draper gives him the note to close their U.K. tour with ‘Be There’.

When the gig finishes, the outgoing and open-hearted atmosphere does not vanish; the fans remain to wait for the duo to come out and have a chat with them. The small room of the Welsh Club created some sort of connection between the audience and the band, ensuring a successful outcome of the gig.

With nine out of eleven dates sold out, Seafret concluded a very positive tour in Cardiff. As newcomers in the world of music they still need to improve their music and lyrics. Their songs often tend to be repetitive – especially in the lyrics where the writer, Sedman, lacks a bit of creativity of topics. Most of their songs are, in fact, simply about love and heartbreak. Their latest release, ‘Blank You Out’, has suggested that future songs will have a more upbeat sound, which would break a bit the repetitiveness that their tracks sometimes display.

However, these considerations did not call into question their talent.  The gig impressed me. Its emotionality created by the combination of Sedman’s angelic voice and Draper’s fantastic multi-tasking musical abilities made the atmosphere enjoyable and unforgettable. The concert left me very content by the friendly and welcoming ambience which was helped by the small size of the event.

Andrea Gaini

Image: Caterina Dassiè

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